Anyone fancy flying to Netherthorpe?


Netherthorpe is short, so no, not me thanks!

Cessna F150L, G-AZXC

Report name:
Cessna F150L, G-AZXC
Registration:
G-AZXC
Type:
Cessna F150L
Location:
500 metres south-west of Netherthorpe Airfield, Nottinghamshire
Date of occurrence:
25 May 2006
Category:
General Aviation – Fixed Wing
Summary:
Shortly after takeoff the engine failed and a forced landing was made in a field beyond the end of the runway. The aircraft landed heavily causing the nose gear to collapse and the aircraft flipped upside down. The engine failure was caused by excessive water in the fuel. It was not possible to determine how the water entered the fuel system but it is probable that the heavy rainfall during the week leading up to the accident flight, while the aircraft was parked outside, was a contributory factor.
FIRST FLIGHT OF THE DAY ALWAYS CHECK ALL FUEL DRAIN POINTS FOR WATER OR 30 MINS AFTER EACH REFUELLING
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Cessna 150M, G-BRNC

Report name:
Cessna 150M, G-BRNC
Registration:
G-BRNC
Type:
Cessna 150M
Location:
Netherthorpe Airfield, Nottinghamshire
Date of occurrence:
02 July 2006
Category:
General Aviation – Fixed Wing
Summary:
During landing, the aircraft failed to stop within the runway distance available; it departed the runway to the left and struck a steel gate. The pilot, in a full and frank statement, attributed the accident to his failure to initiate a go-around at an early stage of the landing. He also considered that his approach speed, the wet grass runway and the lack of a headwind were contributory factors.
Another contributory factor is that the runways at Netherthorpe are short I wouldn’t authorise a PPL student to use them!
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History of the flight

The aircraft was returning to Netherthorpe after a local flight of some 30 minutes. Conditions were
good, with no significant weather, a surface temperature of 18°C, 8 km visibility and a surface wind
from 150° at 15 kt.

The pilot reported that he had just turned onto base leg for Runway 24 at the circuit height of 800 feet.
As usual he applied carburettor heat, reduced power and deployed 20° flap as the indicated airspeed
decayed. In order to maintain an airspeed of 65 KIAS he then tried to increase power but the engine
did not respond. He selected carburettor heat off (COLD) and pumped the throttle a number of times
but the engine did not ‘pick up’. The pilot turned onto finals for Runway 24 at about 300 feet and
transmitted a MAYDAY message, announcing his intention to make a forced landing onto the active
runway as he thought there was still sufficient power to reach the threshold. The engine power
decayed further and, with the propeller just windmilling and the aircraft descending rapidly, the pilot
attempted a restart. This was unsuccessful and so the pilot made his forced landing into a field
previously indicated to him as suitable by his instructors, about 1,000 metres from the threshold.

1

Reims Cessna F150M, G-BGEA

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Engine failure on the approach to Netherthorpe

The ground was uneven and the aircraft landed heavily on the left main landing gear leg, which bent,
and then on the nose leg, which failed. The fuselage, propeller and right wing were also extensively
damaged as the aircraft came to rest. The airfield emergency team attended promptly as the pilot and
his passenger extracted themselves from the aircraft; they assisted the pilot in making the aircraft safe.

Discussion

Because of the damage to the propeller and carburettor, it was not possible to test the aircraft’s engine.
However, on ‘pulling through’ the propeller it was found that the engine compressions appeared normal and there was no evidence of internal mechanical damage. The aircraft had been refuelled with over 50 litres of AVGAS before the flight, which left an adequate reserve of fuel in the tanks at the time of the accident.

The pilot commented that he does not have an explanation for the loss of power. He believed that during the flight he had applied carburettor heat according to his training, including during his downwind checks and on starting the descent on base leg. He also commented that, if the engine problem was due to carburettor induction icing, then his reaction promptly to turn the carburettor heat
control to off (COLD) in his attempt to restore power, was an error.

ROUGH RUNNING =  CARB AIR HOT IMMEDIATELY!

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The student pilot flew an uneventful dual check with an instructor and was cleared to carry out a solo circuit training flight.

During the solo flight the student landed heavily and bounced several
times before initiating a go around.

The instructor, who was observing from the ground, noticed
that the nosewheel had partially collapsed during the landing and proceeded to the control tower to advise the student on the technique to be used for the subsequent landing.

In accordance with the instructor’s advice, the student carried out a further landing keeping the nosewheel off the ground for as long as possible and setting the mixture to lean and the magnetos to
OFF after mainwheel touchdown. When the nosewheel eventually lowered to the ground the aircraft slewed to the right through 180° and came to a halt. The pilot, who was wearing a lap and
shoulder harness, vacated the aircraft through the normal exit uninjured.

IF HE HAD GONE AROUND ON THE FIRST BOUNCE I WOULDN’T BE TYPING THIS!

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Cessna 150D, G-ASMW

Report name:
Cessna 150D, G-ASMW
Registration:
G-ASMW
Type:
Cessna 150D
Location:
Netherthorpe Airfield, Nottinghamshire
Date of occurrence:
14 July 2009
Category:
General Aviation – Fixed Wing
Summary:
The student pilot was carrying out circuits to a grass runway. While landing, the aircraft ballooned slightly and, following an attempted correction, a nose down touchdown was made. The aircraft bounced, landed again and the nose landing gear collapsed as the brakes were applied.
Download report:
PDF icon Cessna 150D, G-ASMW 10-09.pdf (268.37 kb)
IF HE HAD GONE AROUND ON THE FIRST BOUNCE I WOULDN’T BE TYPING THIS!
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PIPER CHEROKEE NETHERTHORPE

The pilot reported that all pre-take-off checks, including magneto and carburettor heat checks at high
power, were carried out with no apparent abnormalities. Take­off was then attempted with 25 flap selected, from Runway 24 at Netherthorpe airfield. The aircraft was loaded to approximately 120 lb
below maximum permitted gross weight. The pilot reported that the aircraft attained an indicated speed
of 55 kts crossing the intersection of the two runways, approximately half way along the available
runway length. The pilot stated that he rotated the aircraft and attained a height of approximately 6 ft
above the ground, when the propeller momentarily stopped and started 4 times in quick succession
before engine failure occurred. The aircraft then lost altitude, cleared the aerodrome boundary hedge
and touched down in a cornfield in the overrun area, coming to rest some 75 metres beyond the

boundary, on a stone and earth embankment astride a minor road. There was no fire, and the four
occupants, who were all uninjured, vacated the aircraft by the normal means. An eyewitness on the
ground noted that the aircraft appeared to have taken a longer than normal ground run, and then noted
that the aircraft had become airborne with an unusually high nose attitude.

Subsequent examination of damage to the propeller indicated little evidence of rotation at the time of

impact with the embankment. Fuel samples taken from the tank drain valves and Carburettor revealed

no contamination. No cause could be found for the engine failure.

Runway 24 is 504 metres long, being short grass, with an uphill slope of 1.9 %.

Local reports indicated a crosswind from the south at 15 kts and dry conditions at the time of the accident, with a QNH of 1009 rnb, and an air temperature of 23° C. The aircraft manufacturers handbook for this type

indicates a take-off roll of 214 metres, and a take-off distance to 50 ft requirement of 503 metres at the accident Weight, with 25 FLAP, MAXIMUM EFFORT on a PAVED LEVEL RUNWAY AT SEA LEVEL.

Factoring these figures in accordance with CAA AIC 90/1990 (Pink 12), and General Aviation Safety

Sense Leañet No. 7A (Aeroplane Performance), for the runway state and ambient conditions at the time of the accident, gives a minimum take-off roll requirement of 313 metres with no margins, or 417

metres with the recommended safety margin. Corresponding calculations for the take-off distance to
50 ft indicate a requirement of 738 metres unfactored, or 982 metres with the recommended safety margin. The take-off run available was 504 metres.

YOU CANNOT GET PERFORMANCE OUT OF AN AIRCRAFT THAT THE MANUFACTURER DIDN’T BUILD IN!

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The latest accident at Netherthorpe!

Cessna 152

Having flown one touch-and-go landing on grass Runway 24, the pilot positioned the aircraft for a second landing. He recalled that the approach had appeared normal, but as he flared the aircraft to land it suddenly lost height and touched down heavily on the runway. The aircraft then bounced twice before tipping forward until it came to rest inverted. The pilot was uninjured and vacated the aircraft unaided through the right window. The pilot stated that he had inspected the aircraft several days after the accident and noted that the cockpit flap selector switch and the flaps, which are electrically powered, were in the fully up position. considered that when configuring the aircraft to land he had inadvertently selected the flaps up.

 

IF HE HAD GONE AROUND ON THE FIRST BOUNCE I WOULDN’T BE TYPING THIS!

I strarted cutting out accidents and pasting them into a scrapbook over 30 years ago- the most common is where the student pilot or PPL failed to go around on the first bounce and the second or third bounce broke the aircraft.

IF THERE IS ANY DOUBT, THERE IS NO DOUBT –  GO AROUND

 

 

 

 

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