EASA rediscovers the Tiger Moth flying manual for grass airfield instructors


March 19, 2013

This is from the latest EASA document

(iii) Exercise 2: Preparation for and action after flight: 

(A) flight authorisation and aeroplane acceptance; (B) serviceability documents; (C) equipment required, maps, etc.; (D) external checks; (E) internal checks; (F) harness, seat or rudder panel adjustments; (G) starting and warm-up checks; (H) power checks; (I) running down system checks and switching off the engine; (J) parking, security and picketing (for example tie down); (K) completion of authorisation sheet and serviceability documents.

I asked my son who is a student with 10 hours P1 to list the things needed for preparation for flight, he said.
IMSAFE  (AS RECOMMENDED BY THE CAA)
WX & NOTAMS
ALTERNATE AIRFIELD SELECTION
FUEL REQUIREMENTS INCLUDING DIVERSION
AIRFIELD DIAGRAM FOR TAXY ROUTE (AS RECOMMENDED WORLD WIDE TO PREVENT RUNWAY INCURSIONS)
MASS & BALANCE CONSIDERATIONS
TECHNICAL LOG-Fuel & Oil state and outstanding defects
PAX BRIEFING (STARTS IN THE BRIEFING ROOM)
AUTHORISATION
BOOKING OUT
Seems I am teaching to a different syllabus than EASA. Still when your completely stressed out, tired and hungry and run out of fuel on the way to the alternate you never ever thought you would use you will be so glad you checked your rudder panel was adjusted. Thank you EASA for reminding me that BOLOX truly does baffle even common sense.
70-90% of aircraft accidents contain an element of human factor error, that’s why the CAA Human Factors exam is the easiest one with the least amount of questions but isn’t it just so much more encouraging that when they are trying to cut you out of the wreckage half way up a mountain that you know the one in 60 rule and the coefficient of lift, cause it’s going to come in real handy for working out your invalidity benefit.
Don’t forget your sheepskin flying jacket and boots, it sure can get cold up a  mountain, oh sorry, yet more human factors.

 

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