No point checking the weather unless you act upon it!

Continuing the September theme of CFIT accidents here is a classic involving a pilot flying above safe altitude and then descending below it to get out of turbulence! Why fly over high ground in the first place in weather like that when enroute to Blackpool, he could have just as easily routed over the sea(or even stayed on the ground, which was the sensible option)? The forecast showed moderate to severe turbulence! Unbelievable that anyone should choose to fly a C150 over the Lake District in IMC with such a forecast. FLYING BITES FOOLS!, 

Ironically I spent many happy hours instructing in this very aircraft at Birmingham, it deserved a better ending! At least the pilot and passenger survived and they can count themselves very lucky.

http://www.aaib.gov.uk/cms_resources.cfm?file=/Cessna%20F150H,%20G-AWLY%20%2009-88.pdf

g-awly a

“TOM COLE/www.abpic.co.uk”

RIP Nick Harper & Steve Harris – CFIT Kilkenny 1983

In 1983 two dear friends and colleagues of mine died flying an IMC enroute descent with two passengers during a flight to Kilkenny in Ireland, it was such a waste of two young lives and so easily preventable. Sadly this type of accident still occurs time and time again today, in fact Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT)  continues to be one of the most common causes of fatal aircraft accidents to both GA and public transport aircraft.

cessna crashes on hill

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Controlled_flight_into_terrain

I first posted about Steve & Nicks accident two years ago, the link is here

https://askcaptainjonspplhelp.wordpress.com/2011/09/13/28-years-ago-this-month-steve-nick-flew-into-a-mountain-and-died/

The understanding and adherence to strict enroute safety altitude discipline is the most important part of an instrument pilots situational awareness and it always amazes me how little attention even some experienced pilots and in particular instructors, pay to this vital discipline

If you are IMC and that includes poor visibility and forget all these ridiculous rules that no one can remember, you can either see clearly to manoeuvre in safety or you can’t, you MUST know exactly where you are and exactly what the safe altitude is at all times.

I once asked 3 different completed IMC rating students at a local flying school what is the first thing you must check before descent in IMC, not one of them knew! A disgraceful example of poor instruction and examination.

If you look at a check list for any UK airline you will notice that in the TOP OF DESCENT checklist it always contains a reference to a safety altitude check. The main reason is you will not get CAA approval for a checklist that doesn’t contain such an item because it is VITAL to safe operation. Instructors spend hours trying to get students to fly on instruments to plus or minus 100 feet which is all very well and good but even if you are the most accurate pilot in the world and can fly an NDB let down while singing The Rock of Ages it won’t help you if you fly into cloud at 1700 feet with a 1800 feet hill in front of you. That’s exactly what Neil Williams, one the world’s greatest aerobatic pilots, did  on 11 December 1977, when the CASA 2.111 he was ferrying from Cuatro Vientos Airport to the United Kingdom crashed in poor visibility into the Sierra de Guadarrama mountains north of Madrid. He was killed, along with his wife and two others.

It’s also what my friend Vic Wilson did on the 8th June 1979. I had a lively discussion in the bar at Shobdon one evening about  flying in IMC, telling Vic he needed to get some training and stop flying illegally in IMC. Vic was boasting that he had never had a days IF training in his life and didn’t need any. I clearly remember him saying he was happy sitting in cloud all day at 3000 feet and that it wasn’t a problem so why would he need to do an IMC rating. After leaving the bar I put my ear to the door and heard him say, These young flying instructors, you can’t tell them anything!

3 years later  he flew into the side of the Snowdon range at 3000 feet killing himself and 5 passengers.

http://www.aaib.gov.uk/cms_resources.cfm?file=/5-1979%20G-ATNY.pdf

29 years later Cessna A152, G-BHAC from Shobdon flew into the same range killing the passenger and seriously injuring the pilot: The AIIB report states

The pilot and his passenger flew from Shobdon to Caernarfon Airfield and planned to return late in the afternoon. On their first attempt to return, they chose a direct route back but encountered poor weather and returned to Caernarfon Airfield. After refuelling, they took off and embarked on an alternative return route via Colwyn Bay and the north Welsh coast. Eleven minutes after departing Caernarfon Airfield they struck a mountainside at 1,970 ft amsl, fatally injuring the passenger and seriously injuring the pilot.

Cessna A152, G-BHAC 03-07.pdf (564.92 kb)

Curiously the pliot had recorded the correct safety altitude on his navigation log but had chosen to fly over 2000 feet below it towards high ground at a height lower than the high ground which was covered in cloud!

I could go on and on so take the points:

SAFETY ALTITUDE, KNOW IT, FLY IT

NEVER DESCEND IN IMC WITHOUT KNOWING YOUR EXACT POSITION AND SAFE ALTITUDE

TURN BACK BEFORE YOU FLY INTO CLOUD UNLESS YOU CAN GUARANTEE TO OUT CLIMB THE HIGH GROUND AHEAD TO REACH SAFE ALTITUDE.(good luck)

THE LATER YOU LEAVE THE TURN BACK DECISION THE HARDER AND MORE DANGEROUS IT BECOMES

DO NOT ATTEMPT TO FLY IN WEATHER CONDITIONS OUTSIDE YOUR EXPERIENCE,  ABILITY & RATING

NEVER LET ‘GET HOME ITUS’  AFFECT YOUR JUDGEMENT

UNDERSTAND HOW WEATHER CAN CHANGE AROUND HIGH GROUND AND COASTAL REGIONS

IF YOU ENTER CLOUD, THINK SAFETY ALTITUDE AND ICING-CONSIDER THE TURNBACK MANOEVRE

TAKE NO NOTICE OF THE CLUB EXPERTS WHO CAN FLY IN ANY WEATHER UNLESS YOU WANT TO END UP LIKE VIC

Fly safe, I leave you with the latest CFIT

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2342790/British-pilot-killed-light-aircraft-crashes-Italian-mountain-fog.html

“Fly like your life depends on it.”