Dont think Stall – THINK LOSS OF CONTROL!


EX 10 & 11 STALLING & LOSS OF CONTROL

G-ARPY-

Trident G -ARPY was being flown by the manufacturers test pilots when it entered a flat spin at 11,000 feet from which it failed to recover. Late recovery action was cited as the most likely reason for the accident.

We teach Stalling & LOSS OF CONTROL because that’s what stalling is, loss of control. Going through the motions of stall recovery at a safe altitude isn’t the only way of learning about stalling & loss of control. This is a very important exercise that needs regular practice especially during PPL training. It also needs a comprehensive briefing, self study and complete understanding. Do not fall into the trap of thinking “Oh well I’ve covered stalling so I will be alright”! In my experience at flying schools, stalling and loss of control is not covered very well at all and then after its covered its forgotten about until skill revision time. That’s not good enough, you should practice at least one stall recovery on every off circuit dual flight after solo consolidation preferably in the landing configuration and turn.

Many pilots have stalled a/c without recognizing that the a/c is stalled but they all know they are loosing or have lost control!

Threat and error management (TEM) should be applied to staling and loss of control. See if you can work out when you would most likely stall the a/c accidentally or where in the circuit it might happen and why.

Think about what errors you might make in getting the a/c close to the stall, errors you might make in recognising the stall and recovering from it.

If you cannot think of any examples of threat and error in relation to stall/loss of control you need to do some serious revision before you fly solo.

Consider that every pilot that is killed in a stalling accident has most likely been taught stall recovery action but the best sort of training also concentrates on not getting near the stall in the first place! (TEM)

G-ARPI Trident Accident Staines 1972 -within 3 minutes from take off at LHR all were dead. There were 4 professional pilots on the flight deck, all had been trained to take stall recovery action but it seems none of them realised that the a/c was stalled.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_European_Airways_Flight_548

LEARN TO RECOGNISE LOSS OF CONTROL AND HOW TO TAKE THE APPROPRIATE ACTION

Other significant stall /loss of control accidents

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_France_Flight_447

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colgan_Air_Flight_3407

http://www.skybrary.aero/index.php/ATP,_en-route,_Oxford_UK,_1991_(WX_LOC_HF)

Don’t forget they were all very experienced professional pilots!

In all of the four accidents mentioned above the a/c suffered LOSS OF CONTROL due to an aerodynamic stall yet not one of these professional pilots recognised they were in a stalled condition. All it need was for the PF to move the control column forward and unstall the a/c, it’s that simple even you and I could do it!  If you suffer or suspect loss of control:-

TAKE STALL/LOSS OF CONTROL RECOVERY ACTION

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